Spring, Tap, Filter?

Antique tap with polluted waterNatural spring water is a luxury that few can afford, but I used to use five litres a day. I’d even hand wash my knickers in it. Before you jump to conclusions, I’d like to say that I’m not a diva. For the seven years I lived off-grid on a narrowboat, my drinking water mostly came from a spring that flowed from the hillside into the canal, and I collected it by bicycle every few days. In clement weather I would sit at the spring and wash my smalls like a wild washerwoman. When I moved back onto dry land, I vowed to never again take running water for granted.

But what is actually in our tap water? As well as potential contamination from heavy metals, some water companies add chemicals such as fluoride. A recent study of tap water around the globe found microplastic particles in 83% of samples. Buying bottled water is obvously not good for your wallet or the environment (if you need any persuasion, see this guide from Ethical Consumer). The easy solution? Invest in a water filter. *Affiliate links are marked with an asterisk*

Water Filter Systems

After a lot of research, we decided to buy a British Berkefeld water filter. It is made in the UK from stainless steel and uses ceramic ‘candle’ filters manufactured by Royal Doulton. The gravity fed ATC Super Sterasyl® filters promise to remove an impressive range of bacteria, cysts, heavy metals, organic and inorganic compounds. Filters need replacing every 6-12 months. A couple of friends have opted for The Berkey, which is a similar system made in the USA. The kit is more expensive but their black carbon filters can last for up to eleven years.

Jugs

For a simple plastic-free option you can use bamboo charcoal filters in a glass water jug or bottle. These bamboo filters from Charcoal People are even delivered wrapped in tissue paper! Black & Blum make stylish handblown carafes* and beautiful glass bottles* with a binchotan active charcoal filter, and sell replacement filters in sets of 3 or 5. When we are on holiday this spring I’m going to pop a couple of charcoal filters into my luggage to freshen up the city tap water while we are on the move. I’m also planning on making a pilgrimage to one of the many free sparkling water drinking fountains in Paris.

Bottles

If you’re looking for something to store your water in while you’re on the move, a stainless steel bottle is a great option. Klean Kanteen are a US based company who make a great range of colourful stainless steel bottles with a variety of interchangable caps. &Keep do a good range of Klean Kanteen goodies* including steel, swing-top and bamboo lids if you want to be totally plastic-free.

We can all do our bit to tackle the plastic water bottle problem. With water companies and councils starting to introduce refill points and drinking fountains, it seems like some progress is being made. Alongside schemes such as the Refill project, I promise you won’t end up dehydrated!

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1 thought on “Spring, Tap, Filter?

  1. The Takesumi we import from Japan comes from the bamboo groves of the master burners. Moso and Tiger bamboos are used for the production of sticks, blocks and powder. Take 竹 (bamboo) Sumi 炭 (coal).

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